Rambler Review

The Terra Trike Rambler – to Buy, or not to Buy? That is the Question!

By Larry Varney
Co-Editor – BentriderOnline.com
Posted on September 21, 2011

I have not seen a more eagerly anticipated trike – posters on our forum greeted the anouncement of its impending release with cheers, and each subsequent delay with jeers. Finally, it is released. Some early adopters have already received the trike, but many more are pestering dealers with questions about details, how it differs from existing TT models, and how long before there are more in stock for test rides and possible purchase. I was lucky enough to get my hands on one for a review. Well, make that two! And my conclusions? Was it worth the wait? Should you consider the Rambler? The answer is: Yes! And No! Turn the page for more.

The first thing you will notice when perusing the Terra Trike website is that there are several models of the Rambler. Four, to be exact. I was able to ride and compare the Internal 8 Speed and the Base 24 Speed. Both have features in common, as well as some significant differences – and the latter mostly involves, as you might expect, the gearing.

The Ramblers share the basics:

  • Wheelbase Length: 38.5 inches
  • Overall Length (medium): 67.5″
  • Track Width: 30″
  • Overall Width: 33″
  • Bottom Bracket Height: 12.25″
  • Seat Height: 15″
  • Total Weight: 37 lb.
  • Combined Load Limit: 300 lb.
  • Turning Circle: 10′ diameter

The Internal 8 Speed has an 8 speed hub, with a gear-inch range of 24 – 80, while the Base 24 Speed, with its 8 cogs and 3 chainrings, boasts a range of 18 – 90. The former has the Zoom mechanical disc brakes, while the latter boasts Bengal mechanical discs. Can you tell the difference between these two brakes? I couldn’t! But the gearing is another story, which leads to my first recommendation.

If you ride in primarily flat areas, and seldom push the limits when it comes to top speed, then the 8 speed may be the Rambler for you. However, if you are surrounded by significant hills, like I am, then you should skip that model and take a closer look at the 24 speed. In car racing, it is often said there is no substitute for cubic inches. In riding bikes up hills, the same can be said for gears. The more, the better, and the lower the granny, the better you will like it.

There is one other factor to consider: weather and riding habits. If you regularly ride in conditions that most sane people would avoid, if you commute rain or shine, summer and winter, then the internally-geared hub deserves consideration. No more worries about gunk getting into your derailleurs – a better foul-weather commuter would be difficult to find.

OK, let’s take a ride on these trikes. As you might expect, they both handle the same. One thing that surprised me: I expected them to feel just like their sibling, the Rover. Close, yes, but the Rambler handles better, perhaps due to it’s lower weight, as well as some other relatively small differences, that seem to add up to a noticeable difference.

The turning circle is a very sharp 10 feet. It’s sharp enough, that if you are moving along quickly and abruptly turn sharply, you might just get the trike up on 2 wheels. This is to be expected, really, with such a turning circle, combined with a relatively high seating position. I would suggest that all riders familiarize themselves with just what combination of speed and turn will get that wheel up. Start slowly, then gradually increase the speed and the turn, to get used to just what combination will get you bicycling, and how to react when/if that happens.

One thing I have noticed about trike riders who buy models with variable recline angles of the seat (50 – 65 degrees here) is that many start out in the most upright position, and then later you’ll see that they have reclined to what is usually more comfortable, the most recline. As you might have noticed, even the most extreme is really not all that much. Many offerings from other companies exhibit a much more serious recline, often in the mid-20′s or even less.

So what does that mean to you? Not much, really. The seats are comfortable, the most laid-back position is beneficial, getting more weight onto your back and off your butt, but there is one other result: less aerodynamic benefit. At lower speeds, such as mid-teens and below, this is not a big deal. Higher than that, into the 20 mph range and above, then it does play a bigger part. The bottom line is that if you want to cruise with the big dogs at high speed, you are going to be working harder because of that rather tame recline.

There’s not much you can do to improve the aero of this trike (not helped by the wide positioning of the hands on the grips, either) – but there is something you can do to make any of the Ramblers go faster: change those tires! The standard tires are CST 20×1.75, 40 psi. Yes, 40 pounds per squre inch! At lower speeds, this is nothing to worry about. In fact, the lower pressures do make for a bit more comfy ride. But at higher speeds, you are going to be working harder, simply because there is more rolling resistance with those tires. Terra Trike offers an upgrade to Schwalbe Marathons. Their 100 psi results in a performance improvement that is noticeable, and well worth the $39.95 cost.

It’s bottom line time: in keeping with the title of this review, should you buy a Rambler? Perhaps. If you have some difficulty in dealing with getting on and off the relatively low seat height of many trikes, then yes, put the Rambler on your short list of trikes to try. If you’re a real hammer head, liking nothing better than showing roadies the back of your jersey, combination of relatively low top gears and modest seat recline angles, then perhaps the Rambler is not for you. But, if you’re quite happy with speeds a little less extreme, if you’re more of a tourist than a racer, then by all means consider the Rambler.

One other factor that may influence your interest: the price. Terra Trike historically offers good trikes at bargain price, and the Rambler is no exception. The 8 Speed Internal starts at $1399, while the Base 24 Speed is just $200 more, at $1599. My advice: unless the weather-protection of the internal hub makes a big difference to you, I would suggest the latter model is a better choice. Go for the upgraded tires, too. And while you have your wallet out, consider getting fenders, too: you’ll thank me when, not if, you get caught out on a rainy day.

TERRATRIKE RAMBLER
Pros: Price, turning circle, adjustability for riders of widely differing heights
Cons: Aerodynamics, standard tires

TerraTrike Announces New Trike Named Rambler

By Travis Prebble
RecumbentJournal.com
Posted on April 8, 2011

In celebration of TerraTrike’s 15th anniversary, they have promised to release 15 new products this year. Their latest offering is the brand new Rambler recumbent trike.

With its sleek styling, higher seat, round tubing and adjustable seat, the Rambler is the love-child of their popular Rover and Cruiser models, taking the best of both and creating an exciting new trike.

The Rambler starts off with a newly engineered “crossbow” style frame thats adds even more stabilty and comfort. Fabricated from round chro-moly steel tubing with an adjustable aluminum boom the frame is sleek and stylish. TerraTrike then gave it a new “Coffee Shop” color scheme of an asparagus green color with custom color decals so you can customize your trike to your liking. Custom colors are also available for an additional charge.

They’ve kept the direct steering and comfort-grip horizontal handlebars of the Rover design, but shortened the overall length and wheel base more similar to the Cruiser.

However, the most exciting feature of the Rambler is its gearing. Available as an internal 8 speed, externally derailluered 24 or 27 speed and features 4 different component levels.

“The Rover was, no doubt, very well received in the market, and we were very pleased to see the trike helping so many new people get into or back into cycling. But, there were still a lot of people asking for something similar but with a more refined design and more gearing, so we created the Rambler.” says Jeff Yonker, Marketing Director at TerraTrike. “We think this design combines all the great features of the Rover and Cruiser and then takes it to the next level.”

The Rambler also comes with a new improved TerraTrike adjustable seat. Recline adjustments from 40 to 90 degrees allows the rider, not the manufacturer, to set the angle at which you feel most comfortable – and at 15″ high, it’s still a full 5″ taller than most trikes. Similar to the Rover, the seat also slides along the frame allowing for quick adjustments for riders with similar leg lengths. This trike is easy to get in and out of and adjusts in seconds.

Because of the design, it has a very small turning radius (in most cases even shorter than a standard upright bicycle). You can take your Rambler into places that had never before been accessible to trikes. They’ve also included locking brake levers as a standard component so you’ll stay put once you get to where you’re going. No more rubber bands or velcro straps!

Renie Rates Rover v. Rambler

By Irene King
RecumbentJournal.com
Posted on October 20, 2011

TerraTrike describes the Rambler as the “love child” of the Rover and the Cruiser. Since I’ve been fortunate enough to ride all three, I have to agree.

I am brand new to recumbent triking, and I was fortunate enough to be able to ride a loaner Rover while I was waiting (and waiting and waiting) for the release of the Rambler. I took a few days to compare the two of them, and the following is my assessment of the two trikes.

The Looks
While the Rambler definitely looks like a deluxe model of the Rover with its crossbow design, high seat, and horizontal handlebars, the Cruiser DNA isn’t readily apparent … that is, until you get it on the road.

First, the initial differences between the Rambler and the Rover are subtle. While the handlebars are horizontal (which my wrists love), the Rambler has a locking brake and the Rover has Velcro. Both work. The new padding on the handlebars is much better than the plastic that was on the 1st Gen Rover.

The Rambler is slightly lower than the Rover, but even side by side, this difference is not readily apparent. The Rambler is about four inches shorter in length, which is more apparent when viewing casually. Although the Rambler is a tiny bit narrower, it has an appearance of a wider stance, but I’m sure that’s due its overall smaller dimensions.

The mesh seat on the Rover has a tighter weave than that on the Rambler; however, the seat on the Rambler has the look and feel of higher quality. Its material seems to be more “breathable,” but at the time of this writing, I couldn’t readily tell the difference while riding in moderate weather.

According to the specifications on the TerraTrike site, both 8-speed trikes have 32 tooth chainrings. However, at 42T the Rover’s chainring on this particular trike is larger than that of the Rambler which gives it a higher low gear than the 32T which comes stock with the IGH (Internal Geared Hub).

The bottom bracket on the Rover is 13 inches, and it’s 12.25 inches on the Rambler, which at first glance, gives the Rover a higher bottom bracket. However, just eyeballing them side by side, the bottom bracket seems equal in proportion on the Rambler, and I’m sure that’s because of its lower height. They both sport straight booms, which restricts the ability to recline, but fits perfectly with the lower bottom brackets of both trikes.

Both trikes I’m comparing have 8-speed Sturmey-Archer IGHs. I have both outfitted with Crank Brothers pedals. The Rambler has Big Apple tires, and the Rover has the stock tires installed.

I rode both trikes primarily on residential streets, but because some of the areas in my extended neighborhood are somewhat rural, I also rode them in dirt and on packed pea gravel.

Rover
Due to the 42T chainring, I never use higher than 3rd gear when I start off from home in the Rover. I usually use 4 on the flats, and crank down to 2 or even 1 on the upward sloping grades that make up my extended neighborhood. Even with the extra required effort, the ride is like sitting in an office chair and pedaling.

The Rover was never designed to be a “performance” trike. I’ve gotten left in many a bike’s dust, and have been ecstatically happy to keep up with joggers. My weekend rides are long, not in distance, but in time because the Rover just isn’t a speedy trike. It is an SUV and rides that way. I wish that it had Big Apples installed, because then the only thing that would be missing is a cup holder and a remote.

The difficulty comes when there are hills to climb. I try very hard not to mash, but even then it’s slow and physically taxing, especially when the rider’s “engine” (body) is out of shape. It can be done, but you can’t be in a hurry. “Hurry” and the Rover climbing hills just don’t go together! Anyone who can lower the GI on a Rover will be rewarded with a good, dependable trike that he can take anywhere. Fortunately, my neighborhood is made up mostly of sloping grades, which has made learning how to pedal uphill a relatively easy task. “Real” hills (or overpasses) will throw in more difficulty, but a fitter body on a properly geared Rover could do it, I’m sure.

Downhills are no problem, of course. It’s that whole gravity thing. Crank up to 8th gear if you really want to pedal or just let ‘er roll!

Rambler
In spite of having about 90% of the same features as the Rover, on the road the Rambler is a completely different animal. This is where the Cruiser DNA really shines.

Although I adjusted the seat at the same recline angle as the seat on the Rover, it “felt” more reclined. This is where you can feel that the Rambler is lower in height than the Rover. While pedaling on the Rover feels like an office chair, pedaling on the Rambler feels closer to a chaise lounge.

I started off at 4th gear and only shifted down to 3rd on a slope. Not only was climbing easier, but I noticed that my cadence was faster. Maybe it was the new Big Apples, but there was no “drag” when pedaling. Of course the road bikes still passed me, but it took them longer to do it.

Handling is very similar to the Rover, and I’m sure that’s due to the direct steer. However, I found that the Rambler has a “sportier” feel while riding. It’s not something that I can really describe, but it feels a little more like a sports car and less like a “regular” car.

While I’m talking about steering, I can say that both trikes – especially when going downhill on a smooth road – ride like they’re on rails. The direct steer is absolutely rock solid at speed, even if it requires a little more effort when going slowly. For someone who’s a new trike rider, this gives me extra confidence that the wheels won’t suddenly take off in another direction without any feedback from me.

I have never felt any tippy feelings when turning corners with the Rover. With the shorter body and lower height of the Rambler, I didn’t feel any concern about rolling over, even though I turned corners at a slightly higher speed. Understand that “higher speed” is relative since I’m very careful while out in traffic.

The one thing that I notice with the Rambler that I really like is a faster takeoff from a standstill. Maybe that’s due to the lighter weight, but I felt far more comfortable in traffic knowing that I could make a faster start and have a little more maneuverability than with the Rover.

When doing my usual ten-mile loop, I notice that I’m able to complete it in a lot less time than I have when riding the Rover. Lighter weight, faster cadence, and smaller chainring all contribute to a faster ride, I’m sure.

By the way, I found that the ride was very similar in many aspects to the Catrike Villager. While the Villager is a lighter trike and a little lower to the ground, the Rambler’s direct steer characteristics reminded me of my test ride on it.

Summary
While I’m not a weight wienie, I can appreciate the lighter weight of the Rambler. This lighter weight, along with the lower height and shorter length, translates into a trike that’s easier and more fun to handle on the road.

At first glance the Rambler’s overall looks are indeed similar to the Rover. It doesn’t give the appearance of a performance trike, but the Cruiser influence is felt in the actual riding, even if not in the looks. The lower stance, the ability to power up hills in spite of the 24GI limitation, its maneuverability, and its relatively low price justifies the Rambler’s position as an above-entry-level trike. There’s even more power in the 24- and 27-speed models for those who prefer derailleurs.

Its weight limit is 100 pounds lower than the Rover, so it won’t fit the big guys who are trying to get into shape. However, it’s ideal for someone who’s looking for something that will last, has a sporty look, and whose upgrade possibilities are limited only by imagination and budget. The fact that it has a lifetime warranty on the frame is a real incentive to own one.

As someone who is trying to get into shape and who is a former jockette, I find that the Rambler is absolutely ideal for my needs. I love the look, the price of the 8-speed was within my budget, and the fact that it came with many features that I would have paid for as options on another model (locking brake, IGH, etc.), made it a smokin’ deal for me.

At the risk of incurring the wrath and ire of Catrike fans, I will say this: For those who are looking for a lightweight trike with an adjustable seat and can’t afford the Villager, please test ride the Rambler. At hundreds less, I think you will find that it will stand up in overall quality and features, and you will be out riding that much sooner.

TerraTrike Tour II and Tour II 26

By Bryan J. Ball
Managing Editor – BentriderOnline.com
Posted on March 21, 2012

Laid Back Cycles in Sacramento is the #1 Dealer for TerraTrike and Greenspeed, visit them at 8137 Sunset Ave., Fair Oaks, CA 95628 or call them at 916-304-2453

TerraTrike announces the beginning of it’s annual “Bag and Flag” holiday promotion. From now through January 1st, any customer who purchases a new TerraTrike either directly through the company or from one of their dealers will receive a free TerraTrike seat bag and safety flag: a $70 retail value.

In order to participate in the promotion, customers must send in a copy of their registration card along with a receipt showing where the trike was purchased to the TerraTrike corporate office. Once verified, the accessories be mailed to them free of charge. Customers ordering direct from the company will have their bag and flag included with their trike delivery.

“We have 5 different models that fit any type of riding, the most comfortable fully adjustable seat in the market, a lifetime warranty on the frames with prices starting at $699,” says Director of Marketing Jeff Yonker.

“A TerraTrike makes the perfect gift for a loved one who is looking to get out and get active, so take advantage of this great deal for the holidays!” said Yonker.

Your Sacramento Valley and Bay Area recumbent tricycle dealer.

RECUMBENT TRICYCLES OR TRIKES AT LAID BACK CYCLES RECUMBENT BIKE SHOP

More Trikes, More Comfort, More Fun!
#1 largest TerraTrike dealer in California 2012!
#1 largest Greenspeed dealer in California 2012!

Here’s some of the choices as you look for your own recumbent trike.

Always test ride several tadpole and/or delta trikes to find YOUR favorite before you buy. Test riding helps you find the perfect trike for you, whether it’s a high seat, low set, 8 speed or twenty seven speeds, test riding will help you find the perfect trike for you.

We would be glad to have you come here to try them and in some cases we will come to you, ask for details. If you are too far away from any shops stocking a variety of trikes we can help you pick one and ship it to you. But test riding is the best.

THERE ARE TWO MAIN TYPES OF RECUMBENT TRIKES
TADPOLE TRIKES

Tadpole trikes have two front wheels that steer. They have one rear wheel, which is driven by the pedals. Tadpole trikes tend to be lower, smaller, lighter, faster, sportier, easy to get into and out of and less expensive than the Delta trikes. They are stable, comfortable and typically more stable at higher speeds and are great for the short or distance riders.

DELTA TRIKES

Delta trikes have one wheel in front that does the steering. They usually drive one of the rear wheels; a few delta trikes like the Greenspeed Anura drive like both rear wheels. One-wheel drive delta trikes pull to one side when accelerating and climbing which can be annoying. The less expensive Delta trikes usually have over seat steering (OSS.) They are usually higher, easier to get into and out of, larger, heavier, slower and less sporty. The least expensive recumbent trikes are Delta trikes.

My preferences revealed:
I prefer tadpole trikes, they are light, compact and sporty. Greenspeed came out with the Magnum tadpole trike which I believe will ultimately replace their and other delta trikes. It’s light, comfy, has an adjustable seat that can go high or low and handles up to 400 lbs.

I prefer drum brakes which require less adjustment and are easy to take off. Disk brakes are typically more powerful but most will find the drum brake more than sufficient.

Everyone has their own set of preferences. Reading is good but only your test riding will tell which you prefer.

Your Sacramento Valley and Bay Area recumbent trike adult tricycle dealer.

More Trikes, More Comfort, More Fun!

#1 largest TerraTrike dealer in California 2012!
#1 largest Greenspeed dealer in California 2012!

Here’s some of the choices as you look for your own recumbent trike.

Always test ride several tadpole and/or delta trikes to find YOUR favorite before you buy. Test riding helps you find the perfect trike for you, whether it’s a high seat, low set, 8 speed or twenty seven speeds, test riding will help you find the perfect trike for you.

We would be glad to have you come here to try them and in some cases we will come to you, ask for details. If you are too far away from any shops stocking a variety of trikes we can help you pick one and ship it to you. But test riding is the best.

THERE ARE TWO MAIN TYPES OF RECUMBENT TRIKES
TADPOLE TRIKES

Tadpole trikes have two front wheels that steer. They have one rear wheel, which is driven by the pedals. Tadpole trikes tend to be lower, smaller, lighter, faster, sportier, easy to get into and out of and less expensive than the Delta trikes. They are stable, comfortable and typically more stable at higher speeds and are great for the short or distance riders.

DELTA TRIKES

Delta trikes have one wheel in front that does the steering. They usually drive one of the rear wheels; a few delta trikes like the Greenspeed Anura drive like both rear wheels. One-wheel drive delta trikes pull to one side when accelerating and climbing which can be annoying. The less expensive Delta trikes usually have over seat steering (OSS.) They are usually higher, easier to get into and out of, larger, heavier, slower and less sporty. The least expensive recumbent trikes are Delta trikes.

My preferences revealed:
I prefer tadpole trikes, they are light, compact and sporty. Greenspeed came out with the Magnum tadpole trike which I believe will ultimately replace their and other delta trikes. It’s light, comfy, has an adjustable seat that can go high or low and handles up to 400 lbs.

I prefer drum brakes which require less adjustment and are easy to take off. Disk brakes are typically more powerful but most will find the drum brake more than sufficient.

Everyone has their own set of preferences. Reading is good but only your test riding will tell which you prefer. At Laid Back Cycles we are here to help you find what’s the best recumbent trike for you. We serve all of Northern California from Tahoe to Sacramento to San Francisco and beyond!

Good News – A Great New Recumbent Hitch Rack

Good News – A Great New Recumbent Hitch Rack

The folks at Alpaca introduced a lightweight, easy to use recumbent rack for 2 tadpoles, or a tadpole and a regular bike. The rack also works with two deltas, two tadpoles, or one of each. It can do it all. These are some of the best recumbent trike racks I’ve seen. Come check them out at Laid Back Cycles in Fair Oaks, CA, near Sacramento.

Your Sacramento Valley and Bay Area recumbent trike adult tricycle dealer.

10 Reasons Recumbent Trikes Are Becoming Popular

So why are recumbent trikes becoming so popular?

• Trikes combine the comfort, efficiency and stability.

• Recumbent trikes meets the needs of recreational riders wanting to ride in comfort, high performance for the enthusiasts, and is perfect for many riders with special needs.

• There is no learning curve on a trike, just sit down in the laid back seat, pedal and ride.

• No longer do people with balance problems have to settle for heavy, slow trikes that aren’t much good for anything but an occasional ride around the block.

• If you are looking for fun, adventure, getting fit and better health, then a trike can provide all of those, it’s just missing you.

• Advantages to hill climbing with a recumbent trike are: you can take it slow and easy without worrying about falling over. On a trike, you can use lower gears and go as slow as you like with complete stability.

• It’s easy to maintain control on soft, mushy shoulders due to the stability of three wheels.

• Recumbent tadpole tricycles such as Greenspeed and TerraTrike are aerodynamic, light and offer a full range of gearing.

• Transporting trikes is becoming easier with folding trikes and with more carrier options coming available as trikes are becoming more popular.

• You can also find a full line of accessories for trikes such as bags, mirrors, computers, lights, safety flags, fenders and more.

This new generation of trikes are cool to ride! When people ride them for the first time it’s inevitably a big grin begins to form. The first thing to do when looking for a trike is to find a local dealer that offers the best recumbent trikes. I recommend either Greenspeed, the god-father of recumbent trikes, or TerraTrike, the dominant driving force in the modern day trike.

One of the top dealers in northern California for recumbent trikes is Laid Back Cycles, they serve the Sacramento, San Francisco, Stockton, and up to Reno area’s. You can find them at www.LaidBackCycles.com, 8137 Sunset Ave. Suite 180, Fair Oaks, CA 95628, (916) 304-2453 http://www.facebook.com/LaidBackCycles

Your Sacramento Valley and Bay Area recumbent trike adult tricycle dealer.

Jim and his lovely wife Dana bought (2) TerraTrike Ramblers from Laid Back Cycles and loves riding them. They have riden them on the American River Bike Trail and with friends that met at Laid Back Cycles. If you also want to be a part of a great community and have a fit for life lifestyle join http://www.facebook.com/LaidBackCycles or visit LBC to take a test ride on a new recumbent trike.

Laid Back Cycles is your Sacramento Valley and Bay Area recumbent trike adult tricycle dealer.

Terra Trike changed his life, says Grand Rapids man who lost more than 200 pounds

From Mlive.com

Cal Olson says he is a “raving fan” of his Terra Trike, the sporty adult-sized tricycle made by WizWheelz Inc., a fast-growing company based in Kentwood.

“It changes your life. It honestly, honestly did,” says Olson as he looks fondly at his blue machine. “These things are a godsend.”

Olson is just one of many who’s life has been changed by finding the freedom and comfort of a recumbent trike.

Read the entire article here

Laid Back Cycles is your Sacramento Valley and Bay Area recumbent trike adult tricycle dealer.

 

FEATURES

  • Heat Treated Aluminum Frame
  • Annodized Aluminum Finish
  • Artisan Level Build Quality
  • Direct Steering
  • 26″ Rear Wheel Standard
  • Laser Sharp Handling
  • Adjustable Seat
  • Adjustable Handlebars
  • Disc Brakes
  • One Size Fits All
  • For Riders Up To 250 Pounds
  • Made In The USA

Want to go fast? Really fast? Then the New Sportster is your machine. This is the culmination of our 15 years experience with trike design. If you are a trike enthusiast, you owe it to yourself to take a test ride on one of these. It accelerates faster, climbs better, and maintains high speeds easier than any trike we’ve ever ridden. And trust us, we’ve ridden them all. This is the supercar of trikes, and a complete thrill to ride.

With its “no compromise approach” to build quality, you can be confident you’re riding the best. The Sportster has a newly designed strong and light weight aluminum frame that can be taken apart for easy traveling. It comes stock with a 26″ rear wheel for higher gearing, and is available in four component levels to suit any budget. If your goal is simply to move as fast as possible under your own power, then look no further than the new Sportster!

The Sportster is available in four different component levels:

Base Level

Elite level

Pro Level

SL Level

Speeds 24 27 27 18
Gear Inch 23″-117″ 23″-117″ 23″-117″ 28″ – 119″
Crankset Forged FSA Tempo
Triple 170mm
30/42/52t
Hollow Forged FSA
Vero Triple 170mm
30/42/52t
FSA Omega
MegaExo 170mm
30/42/53t
FSA SL-K Light
carbon crankset
170mm 53/39t
Front Deraileur Microshift Microshift Microshift Sram Force
Rear Deraileur Microshift Sram X.7 Sram X.9 Sram X.0
Cassette Sram PG-830
11-30 8 Speed
Sram PG-950
11-32 9 Speed
Sram PG-950
11-32 9 Speed
Sram PG-980
11-34 9 Speed
Brakes Bengal Disc Avid BB5 Disc Avid BB7 Disc Avid BB7 Disc
Price $2199 $2599 $2999 $3999

This will be the trike that all trikes are measured against. But don’t take our word for it ..try one out for yourself at Sacramento’s #1 Source for Recumbent Trikes, Laid Back Cycles.

Laid Back Cycles is your Sacramento Valley and Bay Area recumbent trike adult tricycle dealer.

 

Laid Back Cycles is your Sacramento Valley and Bay Area recumbent tricycle dealer.